2012 in Review: A Few Favorite Reader Comments

blogger

Today marks my 230th post since taking up residency on WordPress in late January. Lots of great discussion. The posts will be fewer and farther between for the remainder of the year as we take on some new business opportunities thousands of miles away. The interaction with readers has been my highest honor during 2012. Here are some of my favorite reader comments from the year.

And special thanks to the blogging buddies represented in the three visuals below for their steadfast encouragement throughout the year:

www.project-40.com

www.ourcrowdedheart.wordpress.com

www.writingstraight.com

1. Very inspirational post. This is why you’re on my blogroll – in response to this post.project-40-logo12

2. If there were a way to better put this into words, I would, but can’t. So I’ll simply say thank you for writing this and making it available to a somewhat lost soul who’s often given up on healing and who so desperately needed to hear these words today – in response to this post.

3. Unpatriotic, left-wing, democratic garbage – in response to this post.

4. Steve, this is not funny. Obviously, you’re not the man I thought you were – also in response to the post cited in #3 above.

holly michael5. Your bucket list is not just a list. It’s a framework for how you’ll live your life. You’ve inspired me to create my own bucket list – in response to this post.

6. You’re a very blessed man, but I can see that you already know that – in response to this post.

7. Love your boldness,  Steve, but wasn’t the reader whose comment offended you also within his First Amendment rights? Don’t people have the right to say they don’t want to hear what you have to say? – in response to this post.

8. Thanks for this post. It really helped me understand SEO strategies – in response to this post.

9. Thanks for putting into writing what most of us are thinking – in response to this post.rhonda hardisty

10. I don’t like it. I love it. Best blogging advice I’ve seen on the web – in response to this post.

11. Your dad looks like a young Paul Newman in this photo – blues eyes and all – in response to this post.

Tomorrow:

12.21.2012 – What Time Does the World End Because I Have a Plane to Catch That Day. Seriously.

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Old-School Ads You’ll Never See Again

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THE BEST EDUCATION COMES FROM PROPER TELEVISION EXPOSURE.

WHAT EVERY WOMAN WANTS. I’VE SELECTED THE HAIR DRYER FOR MY WIFE.

SEASON’S GREETINGS FROM THE NRA

How to Get Blog Hits When You Sleep

“Being good in business is the most fascinating kind of art. Making money is art, and working is art, and good business is the best art.” ~ Andy Warhol

***

Years ago, in the world of self employment, I was fortunate one of the most successful local businessmen I know was willing to give me an audience on certain occasions to solicit his sage advice.

He’s one of the wealthiest men in Arkansas, diversely entrepreneurial and a wealth of knowledge.

Out of respect for his time I would call on him only when I needed advice the most.

Crashed at 7:30 p.m. on the Fourth of July 2012. It was a long day.

In passing one morning, he said this:

“The key to making real money is to learn how to make money when you sleep.”

Ever since, I’ve aspired to master the art and science of “making money when you sleep.” It’s surely something to think about.

I’ve never made a dime from a blog post. But my three blog sites do have a future monetary purpose. They’re a platform designed to build a community of followers (more importantly friends) for a book release in the coming months.

And for the record, I just purely enjoy being a part of the blogging community.

But as the release of Light Wins approaches, I’m taking the platform building process more seriously – with a more strategic approach.

And I’m learning more about how to get blog hits when I sleep.

Writing Always Awaits…

Here are just a few things I’ve learned:

  • You must go beyond writing and hitting the “publish” button.
  • You must become a student of your blog’s metrics.
  • In studying your metrics, you can determine which days, which hours and which parts of the world draw the most attention to your posts.
  • I write early in the morning. My posts are usually complete by 5 a.m., but I don’t publish until around 6 a.m. It seems my readers read early in the morning before they go to work.
  • Readers also view published posts via social media during their lunch hour, at the end of the work day and during the evening.
  • My metrics indicate that Sunday, Monday and Friday draw the most attention. Saturday posts are a crapshoot.
  • Promotion of your blog posts via social media is a science where you must draw a fine line. Your goal in blogging is to become a commodity of information to which people look. But beware the danger of over-exposure. Be purposeful in when, and how frequently you promote via social media. It’s easy to post too frequently and get overlooked.
  • Aside from word press blog followers, my best success comes from promotion through Facebook and Twitter. I do roll my posts into Linked In, but the results are minimal.
  • Twitter promotion is an art. It’s a fast-moving medium and a challenge to get noticed. You must be creative in your short Twitter tease for someone to take notice.
  • Use every short link possible in your post. Refer readers back to previous and related posts you’ve written. My goal is to get readers caught up in a web where they’re not just looking at one post, but clicking through several on each visit. It’s measureable, and you can see it working.
  • Show respect to your followers, likers and those who comment. If they’ve taken time to read your work, it’s the ultimate compliment, and I do everything I can to return the favor.
  • Establish a “predictable” publishing cycle. I expect my daily newspaper to arrive in my driveway every morning around 5 a.m. Your readers may expect the same of you. As a blogger, YOU ARE are a publisher with the potential for a wide-reaching impact. My posts can generally be expected at 6 a.m., noon, and sometimes if I’m bored, around 7 p.m.
  • Topically, you can carve out a niche, or go with diversification. Some bloggers have huge success with advice on writing, self-publishing or photography. Others simply chronicle their life on a variety of topics. Both work, and both have their benefits. I try, with moderate success, to do both.
  • Be consistent in your categories and tags. Most of my posts are categorized in the topics of writing, books and publishing. And I always tag my own name and the name of my book. If you show up in the same place frequently, others will know better how to find you.
  • And follow the advice wordpress gives. Limit the sum of your categories and tags to nine. If you go beyond that, your strategy may not work. I always go with three categories and six tags, and almost always get the placement I desire.
  • When you have an idea for a post, write it down and put it in your pocket. It’s easy to forget a great idea.

For me, it’s a cheap thrill to get out of bed and find I’ve had a hundred views over the night. It’s just one of the things that gets my day off to a good start.

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How to Kill Blogger’s Block: Just Live Your Life, Man.

Over time, I’ve seen a number of bloggers, authors, etc., talk about their challenges with writer’s block.

It’s a rare thing for me, but I have experienced it. From my desk, the bigger challenge is finding the time to write all there is to say.

Lately, it’s been a huge challenge. Not the block, but the block of time I need.

And the challenge has manifested itself from the simple approach of not caring too much about it and just living my life.

When I quit caring and just live, the writing possibilities become almost endless.

The life experience really is the writer’s palette (that sounds way more sophisticated than I really am) and living life well allows us to paint some beautiful pictures.

Living my life a couple of years ago during a bucket-list check in Yellowstone National Park, Montana.

Just recently…

Finding it hard to put things in words?

Writer’s block got you pinned to the mat?

Go live your life, man. Go live your life.

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The Best Advice I Can Give You For Your Blog: Establish One, Then Launch Two More

(Blogger‘s Note: This post is targeted to bloggers who are working to build a strong social media platform – for those who are building a base for marketing their work. For those who simply enjoy a post now and then for the pure pleasure, this advice is absolutely NOT necessary. ~ steve)

***

It’s taken four months for me to build a solid primary blog at this site. It started with a specific purpose, then it evolved. Through my keyboard punches it took on a life of its own, and I recognized it wasn’t the best of things. Instead of being the focused site I’d intended, it grew to become vague. Mid-way through its early life, it lost its own self-identity.

Over time I found myself writing on a variety of topics – whatever came to mind that I thought was important. It was general, mediocre and blase’.

I didn’t want my primary blog to be grey. I wanted it to be black and white.

Most of what I publish on this site is objective. There’s a casual commentary here and there, but mostly, it’s written in journalistic style, and moreover, it’s about building a platform for book marketing. When I recognized my focus had become more like a shotgun pattern than a single bullet, I had to consider my options.

One consideration was limiting the things I wanted to say. But I REALLY didn’t want to do that.

So I created another blog, a sister blog; and then another cousin blog.

And it’s the best move I’ve made to enhance the platform and achieve every purpose I wanted.

***

Because I wanted the primary site to remain objective, I needed a second site where I could provide opinionated commentary. Objectivity is great, but there’s a huge place in the blogosphere for personal opinion, too. People love sharing their opinions.

So I created something short and sweet. www.seventhingsidliketosay.wordpress.com is the place where I can offer “sidebar” commentary on an objective post in the primary blog. Link the two together with a short link on each post and you’re creating a web of activity that has a life of its own. Sometimes, readers get caught up in the web and find it hard to get out.

That’s what we all want for our sites, right? Readers will move back and forth between your sites if you make it easy for them.

Does that make sense?

***

Then, Dana and I had the opportunity a few months back to do something truly unique. A once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, perhaps, to build a vacation home in Puerto Cayo, Ecuador. Our home is under construction there now.

I viewed it as a singular, focused adventure that I wanted to chronicle through publishing – for ourselves and interested readers and future expatriates.

So the cousin-blog became www.latitudeone.wordpress.com. It addresses our interest in expatriate living and is intended to inspire others to know that dreams can, in fact, be lived out.

Throw a little short link down at the bottom of a latitudeone post referring people back to the primary and sister blog works too. So the platform became a triangle with readers moving from one point to another with very little effort on my part.

This approach serves every purpose for me. It give’s me focused creative outlets at three specific distribution points, moves readers to and from point to point with easy links, and more often than not, a follower of one blog becomes a follower of the others, so the platform building is magnified x3.

If you’re purposefully working to build a strong social media platform, consider giving birth a happy “family” of blogs.

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It’s an Honor: An Open Letter to WordPress Bloggers and Those Who Read My Blog

“If you would not be forgotten as soon as you are dead and rotten, either write things worth reading, or do things worth the writing.” ~ Ben Franklin

On any given day, there are at least half a million blog posts on wordpress.com

It’s a dose of reality reminding me that my work is just another grain of sand on a long stretch of beach.

When it comes to writing, I’m a purist. I don’t do “musings,” or “ramblings.” Poetry’s not my bag, and I won’t be sharing recipes with you any time soon. There’s a place in the blogging world for all those things, I suppose. It’s just not particular cup of tea.

There’s an irony to my blogging posts. By day, I’m a private, guarded person with a close circle of only a few friends to whom the guard comes down. But at the keyboard, something magnificent happens because it allows transparency to flow.

I will share with you, the blogging world, my shortcomings, my failures, and more importantly the lessons learned. And I say a prayer before hitting the “publish” button that it will make a difference in someone’s life on any given day. It’s a powerful thing and an honor to be able to share.

Every writer’s greatest honor is to be read.

It’s a rush to sit in a rural corner of northeast Arkansas, USA, and see that someone in Gibraltar or the Netherlands, New Zealand or Indonesia has taken time out of his or her day to read your work.

It brightens my day when someone takes time to read and “like” the blog post of the day.

And whether they agree or disagree, it’s a thrill when a reader comments and gives feedback to the words you typed earlier in the morning.

I’m thankful to have a creative outlet to share an experience, thought or opinion.

And so know this: When you read my blog, you do me the highest honor, you make my day and you reinforce the purpose within me.

For that, I am thankful.

(Blogger‘s note: For the next two weeks, I’ll be blogging from Puerto Cayo, Ecuador with my wife where we’ll be sharing experiences from our own “Amazing Race.” See you on the equator.)

What do Jesus, Sarah Palin and Al Sharpton Have in Common?

Not that much that I can see, honestly. But they all get a lot of “hits.”

I love writing. And almost as much as I love writing, I love the metrical study of writing and what gets people’s attention. The world of communication now moves with lightning speed, and by virtue of sheer volume, it takes something special to get readers to stop and read – something that tugs at their heartstrings.

It’s funny I’ve noticed in recent months that a photo post of my dog often generates more “likes” and responses than almost any other thing I can post on Facebook. It’s a humbling thing for someone who considers himself a journalist.

Yesterday, I took a daylong fast from coffee and a few other personal indulgences… and I had a bad back ache. The ensuing bad mood gave me the perfect excuse to make a quick “airing of grievances” on FB.

The post was simple. Three things I don’t like on my wall:

  • People telling me I don’t love Jesus if I don’t “repost” their post about how much they love Jesus.

Anything about Sarah Palin. I don’t care for Sarah Palin.

Inciteful posts about the Trayvon Martin case used by a number of “journalists” to promote racial conflict for the advancement of their personal agendas.

Interestingly, dozens of “likes” and comments poured in through the day and throughout the night. And they came from people across the spectrum of religious and political beliefs.

Let’s take these one at a time:

  • I’m going to be bluntly candid about this. Jesus loves you. He loves you with as much love as there is in the universe.  But He doesn’t give a crap about your professed love for Him on Facebook. If it makes you feel good, so be it. I just don’t think it’s the depth of commitment for which He’s looking. Offer a kind word to someone who’s down, or help a neighbor in need. That’s the ticket.
  • I don’t blame Sarah Palin for putting herself in a position to make money. Flukes happen, and she’s the product of one of the greatest political flukes in modern-day. I do, however, take a stand against  FOX News for using her as a ratings enhancer, and today, NBC’s Today Show for allowing her to co-host with Matt Lauer, a fine journalist. It’s Today’s response to Katie Couric‘s weeklong guest host stint on Good Morning America. Does Sarah Palin really have that much of value to say to us? I’ve yet to see it. Her intellectual stimulation fails to reach me. But she’s a great performer. I’ll give her that. Nothing more.

  • Finally, Trayvon Martin. Maybe the most irresponsible journalistic hype since Nancy Grace adopted the Casey Anthony cause. We now have Al Sharpton leading America’s case against the injustice done against Trayvon Martin … and not that it wasn’t a major injustice. But it’s no longer about Martin. It’s about Sharpton and self promotion and elevating his status as a journalist/activist (the two of which just don’t jive). Shame on you MSNBC. You’re better than that. And out of the woodwork comes Geraldo Rivera. Give it up Geraldo – the original self-promoting journalist. Go home.

David Brinkley, Peter Jennings, Andy Rooney and Tim Russert – I miss  you guys. But you wouldn’t want to see what this has become, anyway.

Now, for a cup of coffee to improve my mood.

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