The Binge: 12 Lessons Learned

“The only book that shall ever be written is the one that flows up from the heart, forced out by the inward pressure. When such a work has gestated within a man, it is almost certain that it will be written. The man who is thus charged with a message will not be turned back by any blase’ consideration. His book will be, to him, not only imperitave, it will be inevitable.” ~ A.W. Tozer from “God’s Pursuit of Man.”

Over the long weekend, I reverted to a style that has served me well from college to the present.

I was never good at composing research papers over extended periods of time, never embraced studying a bit each day, and really never have been good at doing a “little bit” of anything. For most of the things I do, I have to go “all-in.” It’s why I stay away from casinos.

I’m a binger.

It goes agains the conventional writing style that most experts will offer. Most say the best way to begin writing is just that, begin writing … write something each day, even if it’s just a few hundred words. That’s good advice for beginning writers, I’ll grant you. It creates a habit, and habits are good things for writers.

But if you’ve moved to a point where you’re more serious in your work, the notion of bits of pieces of writing daily may no longer work.

It’s become apparent that if my first book has any chance of being released by Thanksgiving – I must binge.

Last weekend, Friday 3am through Sunday noon was a 57 hour writing session with very few breaks. It was productive, resulting in nearly 10,000 words of decent copy.

When you write for three days straight, you inevitably learn some lessons. Here are 12 I learned:

  1. Without moving your cell phone’s switch to the “off” position, it will continue to ring.
  2. A.W. Tozer is magnificent.
  3. Periodic naps help.
  4. Grape juice keeps you going.
  5. One moment, you think what you’ve written is brilliant. On second read, it can sound really stupid.
  6. Sometimes, just sometimes, volume trumps quality.
  7. There’s no substitute for a good chair.
  8. The environment in which you write can make a huge difference.
  9. If you have a random thought, put it on paper immediately.
  10. Sometimes, it’s more important to write randomly, than chronologically.
  11. It’s ok to take a short Facebook break now and then, but just a short one.
  12. It’s going to take at least three more binges to get this thing done.

—30—

Going on a Binge

BINGE – an act of excessive or compulsive consumption…

Twenty-four hours from now, I’m going on a 60-hour binge – a writing binge that is.

If you’re like me, you necessarily live your life in compartments – work, play, family time, hobbies, service, etc.

Our hope is that the lessons from the good compartments somehow permeate over into the not-so-good ones and that, in the process, we somehow find a pleasing life balance.

Unfortunately, I live life in binges.

Never have I been able to do a little bit of anything. I can’t just run 3 miles, it has to be 10; can’t just plant a small garden, it has to be an acre-plot; can’t just grill a few burgers and steaks, it has to be enough to feed the entire neighborhood.

And to be effective, I can’t just write effectively in spurts, it has to be extended, focused, dedicated time with a closed door, silence and no distractions. It has to be hours, not just an hour. And sometimes, days.

The book is now written and complete in my head, but it does me nor anyone else any good in that foggy place. It’s time for the vision to move through the heart, pass though the fingertips and onto the keyboard.

The interviews are complete; I see the pages; the sidebars are tucked away in the right corner of my brain; the graphics are in sight; I see the bolds, the itals and the garamond fonts; and the cover, it’s a thing of beauty to me.

But alas, they are but a vision. It’s time to let the Light produce the vision so all can see it.

The 60-hour binge is almost here.

I’ll see you when the binge is over.

I hope the hangover’s not too bad.

—30—